shitantichoiceprotesterssay:

As an escort, these are things I WISH we had time to tell clients as they walk to the clinic.

  • Protesters don’t have any concept of personal space or the word “NO”. However, that doesn’t mean it is pointless to say it. The protesters need to hear “GO AWAY” and…

mdthwomp:

Unfriendly reminder that in America it’s reasonable to say an unarmed black kid deserved to be shot six times because he might have robbed a convenience store, but a white kid shouldn’t be kicked off the high school football team just because he violently raped a girl.

samanticshift:

chasewoods:

The Events in Ferguson will one day make a great movie for white people to feel guilty about and give an academy award to

and the story will revolve around a white journalist who ultimately realizes that wow, we’re all human

thankful-werewolf:

puhgs:

really tho straight guys will go on and on about how uncomfortable it makes them when gay guys hit on them but lets be fucking honest how many times have u seen a guy continue to hit on another guy after hes visibly uncomfortable vs. how many times a straight guy has continued to hit on a girl after shes visibly uncomfortable 

This needs more notes

(Source: nymphwitch)

Anonymous Asked
QuestionSo, if boobs aren't sex organs like all you feminists claim, then what's wrong with commenting on them? If you have purple hair, I'm going to mention it! If you have giant boobs, I'm going to mention it! If they're not sexual, then what's your problem? Answer

okcreepsters:

Translation: I don’t understand the difference between sex organs and secondary sex characteristics, nor do I understand how society has coded certain secondary sex characteristics to be sexual while others are left “neutral.” I also don’t understand how I am drawing a false equivalency between hair and breasts, as only one has been sexualized within Western cultures, and I’m really desperate to justify my own obsession with sexually harassing women.

"These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize."

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

(via geekyjessica)

Yesssssss.

(via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

Its hard for men to understand why women dont get loud & angry because they havent spent their entire lives being reprimanded whenever they take up too much space. (via pluralfloral)

  • privileged people: the problem isnt the actual problem!! the problem is that youre not reacting to the problem the way i feel you should be reacting to the problem!! even though im not experiencing the problem in any way therefore i really shouldnt dictate the way the problem should be solved but--- HEY LISTEN TO ME YOU HAVE TO LISTEN TO ME THATS EQUALITY!!!

grass10:

””“”“why did you cut your hair?::”“”“”  i cut my hair to piss you off. specifially you, i was thinking of you when i cut my hair. i was thinking that you, specifically, would be interested in what my newly short hair meant to you, specifically.

mediamattersforamerica:

"Let men be men": Fox hosts eagerly agreed with the NY Post article that claimed “catcalls are flattering.” 
A few more gems from this segment: 
"They mean it in a nice way."
"It’s nice to get compliments."
"As long as you don’t come within arms length, it’s fine."
But for many women, catcalls are humiliating and degrading. Some blame themselves, wondering what they could have done differently to prevent it. And the consequences can considerably affect a person’s social behavior and habits, as women report “they avoid eye contact and walking alone in public, or change their outfits or routes to avoid harassment.”  
In reality, this is no small problem. According to Stop Street Harassment, “at least 65% of women have experienced catcalls, leers, and unwanted sexual propositions,” disproportionately affecting those with low incomes, women of color, and the LGBTQ community. And while there are federal laws protecting women from workplace harassment, street harassment is addressed on a state-by-state basis.
Let’s bring some voices of reason into this discussion:
Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY:

Catcalling does not mean you are beautiful, smart, strong or interesting. Catcalling means a stranger values you so little he doesn’t care if he makes you feel uncomfortable or threatened.

Margaret Eby, Brooklyn Magazine:

Catcalling is about control, not about your cute shorts. It’s an assertion that women are just visitors in a male space, there to be assessed by appearance and summarily dismissed or flirted with.

Ashley Ross, TIME:

To legitimize catcalling is to give voice to those who don’t deserve it: the man who told me he wanted to perform oral sex on me, the man who said he wanted it the other way around and the man who said he could have me if he wanted me. 

The dehumanizing culture of catcalling must stop, but conservative media outlets like Fox aren’t helping. It’s up to us all to educate ourselves about the harms of harassment, so that women can truly be free in the streets of America.
mediamattersforamerica:

"Let men be men": Fox hosts eagerly agreed with the NY Post article that claimed “catcalls are flattering.” 
A few more gems from this segment: 
"They mean it in a nice way."
"It’s nice to get compliments."
"As long as you don’t come within arms length, it’s fine."
But for many women, catcalls are humiliating and degrading. Some blame themselves, wondering what they could have done differently to prevent it. And the consequences can considerably affect a person’s social behavior and habits, as women report “they avoid eye contact and walking alone in public, or change their outfits or routes to avoid harassment.”  
In reality, this is no small problem. According to Stop Street Harassment, “at least 65% of women have experienced catcalls, leers, and unwanted sexual propositions,” disproportionately affecting those with low incomes, women of color, and the LGBTQ community. And while there are federal laws protecting women from workplace harassment, street harassment is addressed on a state-by-state basis.
Let’s bring some voices of reason into this discussion:
Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY:

Catcalling does not mean you are beautiful, smart, strong or interesting. Catcalling means a stranger values you so little he doesn’t care if he makes you feel uncomfortable or threatened.

Margaret Eby, Brooklyn Magazine:

Catcalling is about control, not about your cute shorts. It’s an assertion that women are just visitors in a male space, there to be assessed by appearance and summarily dismissed or flirted with.

Ashley Ross, TIME:

To legitimize catcalling is to give voice to those who don’t deserve it: the man who told me he wanted to perform oral sex on me, the man who said he wanted it the other way around and the man who said he could have me if he wanted me. 

The dehumanizing culture of catcalling must stop, but conservative media outlets like Fox aren’t helping. It’s up to us all to educate ourselves about the harms of harassment, so that women can truly be free in the streets of America.

mediamattersforamerica:

"Let men be men": Fox hosts eagerly agreed with the NY Post article that claimed “catcalls are flattering.” 

A few more gems from this segment

  • "They mean it in a nice way."
  • "It’s nice to get compliments."
  • "As long as you don’t come within arms length, it’s fine."

But for many women, catcalls are humiliating and degrading. Some blame themselves, wondering what they could have done differently to prevent it. And the consequences can considerably affect a person’s social behavior and habits, as women report they avoid eye contact and walking alone in public, or change their outfits or routes to avoid harassment.”  

In reality, this is no small problem. According to Stop Street Harassment, “at least 65% of women have experienced catcalls, leers, and unwanted sexual propositions,” disproportionately affecting those with low incomes, women of color, and the LGBTQ community. And while there are federal laws protecting women from workplace harassment, street harassment is addressed on a state-by-state basis.

Let’s bring some voices of reason into this discussion:

Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY:

Catcalling does not mean you are beautiful, smart, strong or interesting. Catcalling means a stranger values you so little he doesn’t care if he makes you feel uncomfortable or threatened.

Margaret Eby, Brooklyn Magazine:

Catcalling is about control, not about your cute shorts. It’s an assertion that women are just visitors in a male space, there to be assessed by appearance and summarily dismissed or flirted with.

Ashley Ross, TIME:

To legitimize catcalling is to give voice to those who don’t deserve it: the man who told me he wanted to perform oral sex on me, the man who said he wanted it the other way around and the man who said he could have me if he wanted me.

The dehumanizing culture of catcalling must stop, but conservative media outlets like Fox aren’t helping. It’s up to us all to educate ourselves about the harms of harassment, so that women can truly be free in the streets of America.